~ A boy in children's church came to me and said curiously: 
I just have one question.. why does Andy's eyes go in different directions. I told him that "Andy was in a coma and it hurt his brain" and he said smiling.. "well, at least you still have him!!" and he shrugged like to say no big deal and off he went. I wish some adults were that graceful! :)

Most parents of Special Needs children can tell you stories of the odd & horrible things people have said. I personally don't mind when people "look longingly" (lol) at us, because I probably do the same thing when something is out of the norm. 

Most people just smile and say "God Bless You Honey" which probably means YOU POOR THING. lol.. but I take it as one of the good comments. lol. Does anyone have any gracious people that you have met on your journey so far? 

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I agree.  I'm completely ok with questions.  The questions are easier when they are from children because they ask them without any extra body language...like the "you poor thing" look.

 

I had one adult female ask me how my Daughter caught Down Syndrome.  I just shrugged and sneezed on her.

i have a special needs nephew whom was born at 27 wks. he is now 14. he is stuck in a wheel chair and has lil mobility. but he is our gift from god. they live states away so we took a trip and my 7 yr old met him for the first time and ask "mommy was is kaleb in a wheelchair and cant play with me like the others" stund at the question i went to explain but before i could kaleb had remember me always telling him that god made him extra special so that us other angels would be thankful for what we had . kaleb is not ashamed at how god made him and he has been taught to not be mad for his disabilities. it is hard to explain to children about "angels" with disabilities. but i found it to be alot easier to tell my children that a blind man walking down the street was made extra special by god for reasons only god knows and we should be greatful for what we have daily!

As a parent of a child with "Special Needs", I feel truly blessed that God chose me to be his Mommy. Alot of people have said to me "I just don't know how you do it"! They have no idea at just what I have to do and how blessed I am to know that I am able to do it. I feel like I have something that not everyone has Unconditional Love.

I agree Tammy. They have said that to me too and I tell you, it's our little secret! :) God has entrusted us and I too am thankful! 

The only issue I have with Down Syndrome is having to deal with people that won't even give her a chance to do her best.  Otherwise, it's cake.

I have two boys that are both on the autism spectrum, one more severe then the other. I remember the days at Wild Waters when my youngest would have a melt down and it felt like everybody was looking at me most likely thinking the he was just a spoiled brat. I find myself feeling bad for the parents I see that have yet to get their child comfortable with the busy world outside of their home. I wish more people would at least read up on the problems children today face so that maybe just maybe they would better understand what the children and the parents are going through.

Since I wrote this post, I was entrusted to have a little three year old boy in my home (fostering to adopt if it gets to that point). April 2012. He has Autism and is non-verbal. What an incredible boy. They teach classes in some schools now about bullying. Maybe the parents should be required to attend those classes as well. Including the topic of children/adults that have special needs beyond their control.  It won't end the ignorance, but it certainly would be a step in the right direction. Most every kid will throw that sort of fit somewhere at some time, so don't look around: there will be stares for sure, but move forward. They don't live your life and don't get a say in it, unless you allow them to. :) 

I knew nothing about it until I had my own child that needs extra help sometimes. I think we, as parents of special needs children, should be the driving force to educate others about it. After all, noOne knows it better than we do. We live it! 

Sometimes even the parents are hard on the special needs child. I took a young man under my wing because his father was embarrassed that his son was autistic. He would have the young man stay at home and play video games as long as he stayed out of the way. I introduced him to therapeutic riding. I first showed him how to groom the horse and care for the saddle, slowly I got him more comfortable with the animal. It took forever to get the parents consent for the young man to ride. When we got him on the horse he was grining from ear to ear. We would go to the restaurant after riding and at first I would order for him. I finally told him he had to order his own food and he did. He knew how to give the cashier money and cleaned up the table when he was done. His father was amazed that the young boy was capable of doing this stuff. He never gave the boy a chance. Unfortunately the family moved back north and the young man had to quit riding. I could imagine how much more he could have learned if his father would have given him the chance.


Yes.. I think we all need special people in our lives that will challenge us to not stay in the "Do what we always do" mentality. That's great that you were able to reach him and challenge him in a way that helped him grow. That's awesome. :) 


Theresa said:

Sometimes even the parents are hard on the special needs child. I took a young man under my wing because his father was embarrassed that his son was autistic. He would have the young man stay at home and play video games as long as he stayed out of the way. I introduced him to therapeutic riding. I first showed him how to groom the horse and care for the saddle, slowly I got him more comfortable with the animal. It took forever to get the parents consent for the young man to ride. When we got him on the horse he was grining from ear to ear. We would go to the restaurant after riding and at first I would order for him. I finally told him he had to order his own food and he did. He knew how to give the cashier money and cleaned up the table when he was done. His father was amazed that the young boy was capable of doing this stuff. He never gave the boy a chance. Unfortunately the family moved back north and the young man had to quit riding. I could imagine how much more he could have learned if his father would have given him the chance.

Congrats Melissa! I'm so excited for you guys. :)

Melissa U. said:

Since I wrote this post, I was entrusted to have a little three year old boy in my home (fostering to adopt if it gets to that point). April 2012. He has Autism and is non-verbal. What an incredible boy. They teach classes in some schools now about bullying. Maybe the parents should be required to attend those classes as well. Including the topic of children/adults that have special needs beyond their control.  It won't end the ignorance, but it certainly would be a step in the right direction. Most every kid will throw that sort of fit somewhere at some time, so don't look around: there will be stares for sure, but move forward. They don't live your life and don't get a say in it, unless you allow them to. :) 

I knew nothing about it until I had my own child that needs extra help sometimes. I think we, as parents of special needs children, should be the driving force to educate others about it. After all, noOne knows it better than we do. We live it! 

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