Police Search For Man Who Tried To Kidnap Two Teens

Thankfully these two girls got away and were not physically harmed in this incident. Police in Orlando are searching for a man who first attempted to kidnap a 16 year old girl at knife point on her way to the bus stop. A car came by and flashed his/her lights at the man and he left. He then attempted to grab a 17 year old girl and she too was able to get away.

What tips have you shared with your children about safety to the bus stop? Have you talked with them yet on how to stay safe and what to do?

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I think it's irresponsible to let children stand alone at a bus stop in the morning and it's an irresponsible to let them get off the bus alone in the afternoon.

 

No talk is needed if an adult is present to protect their children.

Yes, supervision is important, but where do you draw the line? These are 16 and 17 year old teenagers. I can promise most high schoolers are going to be absolutely MORTIFIED if it's their parents insisting on hanging around the bus stop to babysit them.  At some point they have to learn basic safety rules, and the earlier they learn the better....Mommy and Daddy can't follow them off to college to make sure they're ok 24/7.

i have always felt that, you could just stand there and take it, and probably get raped, beaten, killed etc. or you can put up a fight and you might still get the same result but at least you fought! I would never go down without a fight. You will probably end up stabbing me or shooting me anyways, but i'm going to take pieces of you with me.. skin, hair etc. use those nails ladies! DNA is very powerful! Most predators hate a fight, they just want someone who is too scared to fight and will do what they say, they get all frazzled when they have a fighter, now their plan is ruined and most arn't too quick to think of a plan B instantly..Good for these two girls that got away!!! Hopefully he'll be stopped before any more damage is done...

I think that over time...humanity has pretty much drawn the line between child and adult at around 18 years of age.

 

If an adult shows up at a bus stop telling people they are their to babysit their 17 year old...yeah I bet the child would be mortified.  However....if that same adult was in their vehicle, sipping their coffee, and let it be known that they are there to kick some ass if anyone tries to hurt any of them...they probably wouldn't be mortified.  I guess it's all how your present your solution to the particular problem.

Kelly said:

Yes, supervision is important, but where do you draw the line? These are 16 and 17 year old teenagers. I can promise most high schoolers are going to be absolutely MORTIFIED if it's their parents insisting on hanging around the bus stop to babysit them.  At some point they have to learn basic safety rules, and the earlier they learn the better....Mommy and Daddy can't follow them off to college to make sure they're ok 24/7.

My point was only that you cannot realistically supervise a 16-17 year old 24 hours a day, and that basic safety precautions (don't talk to or get in cars with strangers, make a scene/put up a fight if someone tries to force you, etc) should be instilled in children at early ages. It's never too early to start teaching valuable life skills.

As far as no "talk" being needed and being considered adults on their 18th birthday, well, they're going to be in sore shape when they turn 18 and haven't learned one thing about being on their own because they've always been supervised instead of taught self reliance.

You, and other adults you trust, can realistically supervise a 16-17 year old 24 hours a day to minimize the risk.

If someone bad wants to cause your children harm...they'll find a way.  That's not my point.  Clearly you need to also teach your children the importance of safety.  To hear parents make excuses about why they don't want to minimize those risks is what is mind boggling to me.

The female polar bear doesn't just tell their cub about protecting themselves in the wild then push them out the hole.  They stand by their side until they can see with their own eyes that they are capable of survival on their own.

The "no talk" I was referring to was about strangers picking up children at bus stops.  If you're there with your children, no special talk is needed because you've already explained to them why you're there to protect them and you're also setting the example for them to follow with your grandchildren.

I still think it's irresponsible for a parent to make excuses about why they don't have an adult supervising their children to and from bus stops.

I have to agree!! We would never forgive ourselves if something happened to our children that we could prevent by being there. Yes, children should know safety rules for sure. Walking in groups is much better also. Michelle, walking to school to and from school when your 5 is shocking. I think my heart stopped when I read that. I'm glad you stayed safe throughout all those years. :) 


Charles Leazott said:

You, and other adults you trust, can realistically supervise a 16-17 year old 24 hours a day to minimize the risk.

If someone bad wants to cause your children harm...they'll find a way.  That's not my point.  Clearly you need to also teach your children the importance of safety.  To hear parents make excuses about why they don't want to minimize those risks is what is mind boggling to me.

The female polar bear doesn't just tell their cub about protecting themselves in the wild then push them out the hole.  They stand by their side until they can see with their own eyes that they are capable of survival on their own.

The "no talk" I was referring to was about strangers picking up children at bus stops.  If you're there with your children, no special talk is needed because you've already explained to them why you're there to protect them and you're also setting the example for them to follow with your grandchildren.

I still think it's irresponsible for a parent to make excuses about why they don't have an adult supervising their children to and from bus stops.

I was thinking the same thing, Melissa, when I read that at five you were walking Michelle. wow. I mean when I was that age it didn't seem that bad or maybe I just didn't hear about it. Now days I couldn't fathom a five year old walking by themself. I too am glad you stayed safe.

I think you can supervise your children like Charles suggested. And for my son, I don't care if he doesn't like it or not ... I would rather him be mad at me for watching him from the background than to be lost to me forever. I understand that you can't be there all the time and you have to teach them the safety rules that they should know.

Melissa U. said:

I have to agree!! We would never forgive ourselves if something happened to our children that we could prevent by being there. Yes, children should know safety rules for sure. Walking in groups is much better also. Michelle, walking to school to and from school when your 5 is shocking. I think my heart stopped when I read that. I'm glad you stayed safe throughout all those years. :) 


Charles Leazott said:

You, and other adults you trust, can realistically supervise a 16-17 year old 24 hours a day to minimize the risk.

If someone bad wants to cause your children harm...they'll find a way.  That's not my point.  Clearly you need to also teach your children the importance of safety.  To hear parents make excuses about why they don't want to minimize those risks is what is mind boggling to me.

The female polar bear doesn't just tell their cub about protecting themselves in the wild then push them out the hole.  They stand by their side until they can see with their own eyes that they are capable of survival on their own.

The "no talk" I was referring to was about strangers picking up children at bus stops.  If you're there with your children, no special talk is needed because you've already explained to them why you're there to protect them and you're also setting the example for them to follow with your grandchildren.

I still think it's irresponsible for a parent to make excuses about why they don't have an adult supervising their children to and from bus stops.

Good job Michelle! You go girl! Love to see that you made decisions to be great, regardless of your up bringing! I know exactly what you mean when you say.. Breaking the cycle. Way to Go! :D

Michelle Hecht said:

Thanks Melissa  :-)

To this day I think I definitely had someone looking over me.  My mom just did not get the concept of being a mother and now a grandmother.  I’m thankful I was wired differently and that I know what it means to be an involved parent.  When I had children I made a promise to myself I would break that cycle and most importantly tell my kids I love them every day.  I just wish more parents out there would do the same.  My heart breaks every time I hear stories of children being harmed and no one was there to help when they needed it the most.



Melissa U. said:

I have to agree!! We would never forgive ourselves if something happened to our children that we could prevent by being there. Yes, children should know safety rules for sure. Walking in groups is much better also. Michelle, walking to school to and from school when your 5 is shocking. I think my heart stopped when I read that. I'm glad you stayed safe throughout all those years. :) 


Charles Leazott said:

You, and other adults you trust, can realistically supervise a 16-17 year old 24 hours a day to minimize the risk.

If someone bad wants to cause your children harm...they'll find a way.  That's not my point.  Clearly you need to also teach your children the importance of safety.  To hear parents make excuses about why they don't want to minimize those risks is what is mind boggling to me.

The female polar bear doesn't just tell their cub about protecting themselves in the wild then push them out the hole.  They stand by their side until they can see with their own eyes that they are capable of survival on their own.

The "no talk" I was referring to was about strangers picking up children at bus stops.  If you're there with your children, no special talk is needed because you've already explained to them why you're there to protect them and you're also setting the example for them to follow with your grandchildren.

I still think it's irresponsible for a parent to make excuses about why they don't have an adult supervising their children to and from bus stops.



Charles Leazott said:

I think that over time...humanity has pretty much drawn the line between child and adult at around 18 years of age.

 

If an adult shows up at a bus stop telling people they are their to babysit their 17 year old...yeah I bet the child would be mortified.  However....if that same adult was in their vehicle, sipping their coffee, and let it be known that they are there to kick some ass if anyone tries to hurt any of them...they probably wouldn't be mortified.  I guess it's all how your present your solution to the particular problem.

Kelly said:

Yes, supervision is important, but where do you draw the line? These are 16 and 17 year old teenagers. I can promise most high schoolers are going to be absolutely MORTIFIED if it's their parents insisting on hanging around the bus stop to babysit them.  At some point they have to learn basic safety rules, and the earlier they learn the better....Mommy and Daddy can't follow them off to college to make sure they're ok 24/7.

17 year olds go to college. They drive cars, and often work jobs alongside "adults."  They can normally function quite well without mommy or daddy supervising them at this age.  The ones who can't...well, they end up like this kid, who called her PARENTS instead of 911, while her dorm burnt down around her. 

http://www.bu.edu/today/2012/allston-blaze-sends-seven-students-to-...

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